The County of Santa Clara
California

Fiscal/Budget Item
89504
Approved as Amended
Mar 20, 2018 9:30 AM

Consider recommendations relating to the Santa Clara County Youth Employment Initiative.

Information

Department:Social Services AgencySponsors:
Category:Appropriation Modification

Multiple Recommendations

Possible action:
a. Approve delegation of authority to the County Executive, or designee, to negotiate, execute, amend, or terminate Santa Clara County Youth Employment Initiative Agreements with partnering agencies and worksite providers for period that starts no earlier than June 1, 2018 and ends no later than May 31, 2019, with four potential one-year extensions, following approval by County Counsel as to form and legality, and approval by the Office of the County Executive. Delegation of authority shall expire on May 31, 2023.
b. Approve Request for Appropriation Modification No. 140 - $443,128 transferring $159,878 from the General Fund Reserve for Federal and State Budget Impacts and $283,250 from the General Fund Contingency Reserve to Social Services Agency budget relating to compensation of employees and costs associated with operating the Santa Clara Youth Employment Initiative year-round and summer internship programs. (4/5 Roll Call Vote)
c. Approve Santa Clara County Youth Employment Initiative year-round employment-based skills development program.
d. Approve Santa Clara County Youth Employment Initiative summer internship program.

Body

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

On January 19, 2018, the Children, Seniors and Families Committee (CSFC) received a report from the Social Services Agency (SSA) relating to the proposed Youth Employment Initiative. Subsequent to receiving the report, the CSFC approved the SSA’s request to forward a favorable recommendation to the Board of Supervisors to consider the proposed Santa Clara County Youth Employment Initiative (SCCYEI).

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS

There is an impact to the County General Fund as a result of Recommended Action b.

The original budget for the FY 2017-18 General Fund Contingency Reserve was $142,585,595.  Board policy 4.3 states that the contingency reserve should be 5% of general revenues net of pass-through revenue.  Since the use of contingency reserve impacts compliance with this policy, the midyear budget analysis included a $11,785,561  replenishment of this reserve. The balance of this reserve as of March 6, 2018 was $133,514,939 indicating that $20,856,217 has been allocated for other purposes.  There may be additional pending actions that will impact this balance once they are approved and processed.

There will be a $443,128 County General Fund cost in Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 and an ongoing $682,399 County General Fund cost in FY 2019 as a result of the Recommended Action (Table 1). County General Fund costs are broken down by program for FY 2018 (Table 2) and FY 2019 (Table 3).

Table 1

 

Total Cost

State/Fed Revenue

Net County Cost

FY 2018 Year Round and 6-Week Program

$816,494

$373,366

$443,128

FY 2019 Year Round and 6-Week Program

$2,035,647

$1,353,248

$682,399

 

For the year-round portion of the SCCYEI project, the SSA is requesting approval to add two Employment Counselor or Associate Employment Counselor positions. The cost for the remainder of FY 2018 for the two positions to be added is $91,440 in net County cost. In FY 2019, the ongoing cost is $289,194 in net County cost.

For the Six-Week Summer Internship, the SSA is requesting approval to add six unclassified Associate Management Analyst positions and two unclassified Community Worker positions. The cost for the remainder of FY 2018 is $228,124, with $159,686 in federal revenue and $68,438 in net County cost.

The cost for the remainder of FY 2018 for the ten positions to be added is $319,564, with $159,686 in federal revenue and a net County cost of $159,878. The ongoing FY 2019 cost will be $526,342, with $166,004 in federal revenue and $360,338 in net County cost.

This request includes an expenditure appropriation increase of $816,494, with $373,366 in revenue, for a net County cost of $443,128 for overhead expenditure associated with the addition of ten positions.

The cost of the wage subsidies and flexible expenses for up to 300 CalWORKs youth, up to 100 Foster Care youth, and up to 100 CalFresh youth participants in FY 2019 is $1,509,305, with $1,187,244 in federal revenue and $322,061 in net County cost.

Table 2

Year-Round Program Expenses Eff. Mar 2018

 

 

FY 2018

Code

Type

Count

Projected Expense

Projected Revenue

Net GF

Employment Counselor/Associate Employment Counselor (Y27/Y29)

Classified

2

$91,440

$0

$91,440

Subtotal Expense

2

$91,440

$0

$91,440

Six-Week Summer Internship Expenses Apr - Sep 2018

 

 

FY 2018

Code

Type

Count

Projected Expense

Projected Revenue

Net GF

Assoc Mgmt Analyst (W1R)

Unclassified

6

$177,852

$124,496

$53,356

Community Worker (Q96)

Unclassified

2

$50,272

$35,190

$15,082

Subtotal Expense

8

$228,124

$159,686

$68,438

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overhead

 

10

$496,930

$213,680

$283,250

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FY 2018 Total

10

$816,494

$373,366

$443,128

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 3

 

 

 

Year-Round Program Expenses Eff. Mar 2018

 

 

FY 2019

Code

Type

Count

Projected Expense

Projected Revenue

Net GF

Employment Counselor/Associate Employment Counselor (Y27/Y29)

Classified

2

$289,194

$0

$289,194

Subtotal Expense

2

$289,194

$0

$289,194

Six-Week Summer Internship Expenses May - Sep 2018

 

 

FY 2019

Code

Type

Count

Projected Expense

Projected Revenue

Net GF

Assoc Mgmt Analyst (W1R)

Unclassified

6

$185,010

$129,507

$55,503

Community Worker (Q96)

Unclassified

2

$52,138

$36,497

$15,641

Subtotal Expense

8

$237,148

$166,004

$71,144

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subtotal -New Staff

10

$526,342

$166,004

$360,338

 

 

 

 

 

 

Youth Wages

 

 

$1,484,055

$1,187,244

$296,811

Flexible Expenses

 

 

$25,250

$0

$25,250

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FY 2019 Total

 

$2,035,647

$1,353,248

$682,399

 

The cost comparison between the FY 2018 and FY 2019 Youth Employment program is shown in Table 4.

Table 4

 

Internship Population

Wage and hour

Direct Service Cost (including ancillary expenses)

Admin/ Staff Cost

Total Expense

Total Revenue

Net General Fund Cost

FY 2018

300 CW; 100 FC

$15/hour; 20 hours/week

$791,496

$1,593,963

$2,385,459

$1,632,474

$752,985

FY 2019

300 CW;100 FC;100 CF

$15/hour; 30 hours/week

$1,509,305

$1,342,836

$2,852,141

$1,726,614

$1,125,527

 

CONTRACT HISTORY

On May 1, 2010, the County of Santa Clara entered into contracts with the Cities of San Jose and Sunnyvale to implement the Work2Future and NOVA summer subsidized employment programs for 990 youth between the ages of 15 and 17 in CalWORKs or Needy Families. Delegation of authority was received on June 9, 2009. The maximum contract amounts were $2,458,225 and $575,450, respectively, for May 1, 2010 to September 30, 2010. Both contracts were funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) Emergency Contingency Fund (ECF) with a 20% match toward the total ARRA/ECF amount incurred during the program. 

On April 1, 2015, the SSA executed the agreement for the Youth Summer Jobs Initiative Pilot Program (YSJI Pilot) that concluded on February 28, 2016. The program served 867 foster care and low-income youth through a five-week job training program. The maximum contract amount was $1,020,226.

On May 10, 2016, the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors (Board) approved delegation of authority to the Director of the SSA for a one-time County General Fund impact of $356,846 to fund the Santa Clara County Summer Youth Employment Program (SCCSYEP). The term of SCCSYEP was June 1, 2016 to September 30, 2016 and aimed to serve 100 foster youth. Concurrent with SCCSYEP, the SSA ran an in-house TeenWORKs program that aimed to serve 200 youth in families receiving CalWORKs benefits.

On December 13, 2016, the Board approved the SCCYEI year-round employment-based skills development program for period between January 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018; and the SCCYEI six-week summer internship program for period between June 1, 2017 through August 31, 2017. The Board also approved delegation of authority to the Director, Social Services Agency, or designee, to negotiate, execute, amend, or terminate SCCYEI Agreements with partnering agencies and worksite providers for period that starts no earlier than January 1, 2017 and ends no later than June 30, 2018, following approval by County Counsel as to form and legality, and approval by the Office of the County Executive. Delegation of authority expires on June 30, 2018.

REASONS FOR RECOMMENDATION

The SCCYEI is designed to reduce the effects of generational poverty by providing low-income and disadvantaged youth with employment-based opportunities that foster safety, career exploration and exposure to public service. The initiative will serve work-aged youth, ages 16-24 years old, who are enrolled in the CalWORKs, CalFresh and Foster Care programs. The proposed model is largely based on the successful FY 2017 and FY 2018 youth employment models with enhancements to augment case management and extend summer internship opportunities to previously ineligible youth.

Services within the scope of the initiative include two principal components for youth participation: a year-round development program offering workshops and employment events; and a six-week paid summer internship. 

Recommendation a: Proposed Delegation of Authority

The Social Services Agency is recommending that delegation of authority be granted to the County Executive, or designee, to negotiate, execute, amend, or terminate youth worksite agreements relating to the Youth Employment Program. Although delegations of authority are discouraged except under certain circumstances, this delegation of authority is necessary due to logistical constraints and the volume of worksite agreements with private and public employers, including county departments, needed to place 500 youth into internship positions.

Recommendation b: Proposed Staffing Support

The year-round program will leverage existing staff and add two new permanent Employment Counselors to ensure optimal service and adequate staff to manage the enrolled youth in the Foster Care program. Staffing at the Employment Connection Center will remain the same as the preceding year. 

Existing Staff

Recommended Classified Staff

1 Employment Program Supervisor 

2 Classified Employment Counselors

8 Employment Counselors

1 Management Analyst

 

To operate the six-week program, Santa Clara County Intern & Earn will leverage existing Employment Connection and Hub staff, including those hired to support the year-round program. In addition, every year, the program will require unclassified support staff.  These unclassified positions will work for four months, starting in May and ending in August. These temporary positions will be filled for a limited duration each year to provide onboarding support, payroll services, and peer-mentorship during the summer month for the 500 participating youth.   

Existing Staff  plus              Year-Round Program Staff

Recommended Unclassified Staff

1 Employment Counselor Supervisor

6 Unclassified Assoc. Management Analysts

13 Classified Employment Counselors 

2 Unclassified Community Workers

 

Recommendation c: Proposed Year-Round Youth Program

SSA is proposing the continued, and ongoing, operation of year-round career development workshops and events to engage youth participants throughout the year, providing them with a safe and interactive environment to encourage personal growth. The development workshops address the needs of youth entering the workforce and provide exposure to basic life skills and educational opportunities. Employment events will focus on emerging job opportunities at specialized youth job fairs and recruitments. These events provide youth with options for direct entry into employment within the Employment Connection Center employer network. In FY 2017, the workshops served 346 attendees. In FY 2018 (year-to-date), the SSA provided workshops to 187 youth attendees.

Recommendation d: Proposed Six-Week Summer Internships

The SSA is proposing the continued, and ongoing, operation of a paid summer internship for youth seeking direct entry into employment through the County of Santa Clara Intern & Earn program. As part of the internship program, intern positions are developed throughout the community in the public, private and non-profit sectors to ensure that youth have employment options that suit their interests, skills and career goals. These internships will pay $15 per hour, or prevailing municipal minimum wage, whichever is higher, and are expected to begin in June and last up to six weeks. The County will be the employer of record, managing the hiring process, job placement and payroll responsibilities for the internship program.

Based on program evaluation and direct feedback from the 2017 summer internship program, the SSA is proposing three new enhancements for subsequent program years that will expand opportunities for eligible youth and extend participation to new service populations. The SSA recommends: an increase in weekly work hours, from 20 hours per week to up to 30 hours per week; funding to provide transportation and other support services related to the internship; and extension of internship opportunities to 300 CalWORKs Youth (ages 16-18), 100 Foster Care Youth (ages 16-24), and 100 youth (ages 16-22) enrolled in the CalFresh program.

Through SSA evaluation of youth feedback and experiential accounts, a large number of the participating interns suggested that the increase in work hours would improve their internship experience. Data from the evaluation survey indicated that 85% of youth responded that they would like to work more hours; this was especially prevalent amongst youth that have attained their high school diploma (age 18 or older). The increased financial opportunity allows youth to temporarily contribute more to their household without impacting the family’s grant levels.

The second enhancement will extend internship opportunities to CalFresh youth. CalFresh households, often working families, are still earning below the federal poverty level and addressing hurdles inherent with living in a high-cost county. Providing internship opportunities will help low-income youth get a foothold in the workforce and gain confidence as they take steps toward long-term self-sufficiency, reducing future or cyclical need for public benefits. The added income would also contribute to the family’s food budget through the summer period when only 11.5%* of low-income youth are accessing food programs (*Second Harvest Food Bank; “Summer Feeding Sites: A Nutritional Link for Thousands of Kids”).

The third enhancement addresses a need for added funding to provide transportation (VTA Summer Flash Pass) and incidentals, such as background checks and medical exams, to optimize enrollment, increase work opportunities, and ensure ongoing participation in the six-week summer internship program.

CHILD IMPACT

The recommended action will have a positive impact on children and youth through the Healthy Lifestyle indicator by addressing independent living and job skills for foster care, CalWORKs and CalFresh youth in Santa Clara County.

SENIOR IMPACT

The recommended action will have no/neutral impact on seniors.

SUSTAINABILITY IMPLICATIONS

The recommended action will have no/neutral sustainability implications.

BACKGROUND

Throughout the years, the department has supported and administered programs that provide employment-based services to the county’s youth population. Among the larger and more widely recognized programs offered was the Summer Program for the Employment Development of Youth (SPEDY) program. SPEDY offered six-week paid summer internships to low-income, work-aged youth. Eligibility for SPEDY internships was based on reported family income, which broadened the potentially eligible population to any youth from a family earning an income below the 200% federal poverty threshold. With an expansive service population, the program was able to recruit approximately 1,500 youth every summer. The program remained in operation until 1999.  

On December 13, 2015, the Board approved the SCCYEI. The initiative was designed to reduce the effects of generational poverty by providing low-income and disadvantaged youth with employment-based opportunities, aimed at fostering safety, career exploration and exposure to public service. Through the SCCYEI (FY 2016), the SSA developed and implemented TeenWORKs, a youth internship program for CalWORKs eligible youth between the ages of 16-18. The County was the intern’s employer of record and youth interns were placed at a variety of county worksites and partnering non-profit agencies. The program’s goal was to serve 200 youth through placement into six-week internships. Based on their eligibility for the CalWORKs program, all youth wages and staffing costs were funded through CalWORKs funding streams.  In a concurrent effort to serve Foster Youth, the SSA contracted with Work2Future to provide youth employment opportunities to 100 youth enrolled in the Foster Care program. 

In FY 2017, the SSA increased the scope and size of the existing youth internship program, adding year-round youth employment services/workshops and expanding the eligible service population. Year-round employment workshops are available to CalWORKs, CalFresh and Foster youth. Summer internships were available to 300 CalWORKs youth and 100 Foster Care Youth. CalWORKs youth wages were funded through CalWORKs funding streams and Foster Care youth wages were funded through the County General Fund. 

Year-Round Youth Program

Career development workshops and employment events engage youth participants throughout the year, providing them with a safe and interactive environment to encourage personal growth. The development workshops were designed to address the needs of young workers entering the workforce, while providing them with exposure to basic life skills and educational opportunities. Workshop modules include topics of career exploration, educational and aptitude assessments, vocational training opportunities and requirements, social norms and employment expectations, financial literacy, and public service.

Six-Week Summer Internship

Through engagement in the year-round program and additional recruitment efforts, enrolled youth in the CalWORKs and Foster Care programs had the option of participating in the subsidized employment component of the youth employment program, known as the Santa Clara County Intern & Earn paid summer internship program. Internships began on June 19, 2017. The six-week internship positions were offered at County departments, local employers and non-profit organizations for up to 20 hours per week, at a pay rate of $15.00 per hour.

CONSEQUENCES OF NEGATIVE ACTION

The SCCYEI will continue operation through the present Board-approved time period, ending in June 2018. Subsequently, as a consequence of negative action, the County will not have a youth employment program that addresses job skill development to prevent generational poverty and independent living and for low-income youth in public benefit programs.

STEPS FOLLOWING APPROVAL

The Clerk of the Board of Supervisors shall follow the usual process for this type of legislative file.

Meeting History

Mar 20, 2018 9:30 AM Video Board of Supervisors Regular Meeting

At the request of Vice President Chavez, the Board directed Administration to increase the number of reserved placements for current and former foster youth, from 100 to 150 employment opportunities.

At the request of Vice President Chavez, the Board directed Administration to provide an off-agenda report to the Board prior to budget review relating to enrollment requirements for current and former foster youth within the Intern and Earn Program, to ensure flexibility and access to the program; and, explore expanding the current six-week program for older foster youth not in full-time, traditional school settings.

RESULT:APPROVED AS AMENDED [UNANIMOUS]
MOVER:Ken Yeager, Supervisor
SECONDER:Mike Wasserman, Supervisor
AYES:Mike Wasserman, Cindy Chavez, Dave Cortese, Ken Yeager, S. Joseph Simitian