The County of Santa Clara
California

Report
100061

Under advisement from December 17, 2019 (Item No. 13): Receive report relating to funding options to continue the Summer Camp and Enrichment Activities Program. (Social Services Agency)

Information

Department:Social Services AgencySponsors:
Category:Report

Body

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS

There is no impact to the County General Fund resulting from receiving this report.

CONTRACT HISTORY

On May 3, 2018, the Board of Supervisors (Board) approved Inventory Item No. 47, Youth Summer Camp and Activities Program (Summer Camp). The Inventory Item was assigned to the Social Services Agency (SSA) on May 30, 2018. Summer Camp was activated on July 16, 2018 with Kinship Adoptive and Foster Parent Association (KAFPA) and the City of San Jose (City).

SSA executed the Summer Camp agreement with KAFPA on July 16, 2018, for $100,000. The KAFPA contract included 10 types of camps. Scholarship and enrichment activities were incorporated as part of the efforts to provide resources during the summer months. Underutilized budgets in Fiscal Year (FY) 2018-19 were used during the FY 2019-20 summer months.

The City’s contract was executed on August 30, 2018 for $250,000. The agreement incorporated 13 different types of summer camps, which were not immediately activated due to a ramp-up process that required more time. The City’s contract also included scholarships for enrichment activities.

The Summer Camp and Enrichment activity contracts ended September 30, 2019.

REASONS FOR RECOMMENDATION

At the request of Supervisor Chavez, SSA is reporting recommendations to the Board for future consideration relating to the Summer Camp program.

The Summer Camp pilot program was activated on July 16, 2018 with KAFPA and the City. Over the course of two years, approximately 433 children and youth accessed services of up to 89 distinct activities, of which 22% were for Great America, 22% were Raging Waters, 56% (87) were for other distinct summer camps, such as Martial Arts, Dance, Clubs, Happy Hollow.

Lessons Learned: During the first year of development the Summer Camp program experienced various challenges. These challenges included limited exposure, as well as, the limited operational time remaining between when the contracts were executed and the remaining summer months. During the second year the time-frames were extended from March through September. In addition, a collaborative approach was developed to better promote the program through a number of channels, including, various Board Offices, County Divisions, and the two contracted organizations. This concerted collaborative effort helped to bring awareness to the community, which resulted in an increase in participation from 44 youth in FY2018-19 to 389 youth in FY2019-20.

In addition to the measures taken to address the lessons learned as outlined above, and based on knowledge gained throughout the developmental process, SSA recommends the following five strategic interventions to encourage enrollment and enhance participation:

1. Family Enrollment:

a. Contract a vendor that has strong connections to target population and can easily share information, coordinate services, and effortlessly enroll clients into summer camp programs from across the County.

b. Enhance the In-Play Web Portal to allow the community to review available activities and to enroll directly into them from the web portal.

2. Outreach: Facilitate information and enrollment seminars to proactively inform families of resources. Build stronger bridges with various County Divisions, Community Based Organizations and Schools to promote services.

3. Transportation:  Incorporate transportation resources into the budget to use Hop-Skip-Drive to transport children and youth to activities.

4. Geographic Reach:  Contract with KAFPA to act as the coordinator of service and use the Cities and other organizations as resources to access activities. Support KAFPA in forming agreements with various summer camps, or enrichment activity organizations, such as the San Jose Giants, Guadalupe River Park, Youth Science Institute, etc.

5. Sustainability: SSA predicts increased interest in the program with the implementation of the recommended interventions, therefore projecting small growth increments to support a more sustainable plan.

Overall Recommendation: Based on the evaluation spanning the past two years SSA has determined that Summer Camp has offered valuable services to people who may not have otherwise had an opportunity to offer enrichment activities to their children during the summer months. Based on the analysis of data derived from the 433 participants, and lessons learned over this two year span, SSA recommends the Board to consider extending the Summer Camps Program with KAFPA. SSA recommends to the Board to consider the following funding option. Budget details are shown in the tables below for each year.

March 1,2020-September 30, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Budget Category

Amount

Budget %

Clients

Unit Cost

Formula

Summer Camps/Enrichment Activities

$220,000

74%

400

$550

$550 average cost per client

Transportation

$34,500

12%

115

$300

$300 average cost per client

Administrative Cost

$43,350

14%

N/A

N/A

15% of the total operating cost

Total

$297,850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 1, 2021-September 30, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

Budget Category

Amount

Budget %

Clients

 Unit Cost

Formula

Summer Camps/Enrichment Activities

$247,500

74%

450

$550

$550 average cost per client

Transportation

$39,000

11%

130

$300

$300 average cost per client

Administrative Cost

$50,000

15%

N/A

N/A

15% of the total operating cost

Total

$336,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 1, 2022-September 30, 2022

 

 

 

 

 

Budget Category

Amount

Budget %

Clients

Unit Cost

Formula

Summer Camps/Enrichment Activities

$275,000

73%

500

$550

$550 average cost per client

Transportation

$45,000

12%

150

$300

$300 average cost per client

Administrative Cost

$55,000

15%

N/A

N/A

15% of the total operating cost

Total

$375,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHILD IMPACT

The recommended action will have a positive impact on children and youth through the Healthy Lifestyles indicator by providing enrichment activities to children and youth during the summer season.

SENIOR IMPACT

The recommended action will have no/neutral impact on seniors.

SUSTAINABILITY IMPLICATIONS

The recommended action will have no/neutral sustainability implications.

BACKGROUND

On January 19, 2018, the Children, Seniors and Families Committee (CSFC) requested an off-agenda report with information about summer camp options and the associated costs of enrollment beyond the two weeks provided by the Department of Family and Children’s Services (DFCS). The off-agenda report, "Cost of Summer Camp for Foster Youth," presented on February 9, 2018, estimated a total cost of $4,090,050.

Inventory Item No. 47 proposed a pilot project to fund fully subsidized enrollment for the County's youth in many camping and extracurricular activities provided by the City, San Jose State University and other municipalities throughout the summer. This pilot served as a

small-scale preliminary study to evaluate feasibility, time and cost, and improve upon the design before the performance of a full-scale program.

The pilot aimed to serve the following populations: kinship and foster youth, probation youth, CalWORKs, CalFRESH youth and low-income youth. $100,000 of the allocation was to be used for special needs activities.

Enrollment opportunities included, but were not limited to, summer programming held at Happy Hollow Park and Zoo, Emma Prusch Park, Lake Almaden, City’s Community Centers and San Jose State University. Best efforts were to be made to enroll as many eligible youths as possible in summer programming in 2018, with any unspent funds, to be rolled over for continuation of this project in summer 2019.

Foster Families and Low-Income Families voiced appreciation for this service as it offered healthy activities for children to participate in, and periodic respite to families serving foster care children. The Summer Camp activities program experienced ramp up challenges the first year of implementation and was a greater success in the second year of the pilot program as more families became aware of the program.

CONSEQUENCES OF NEGATIVE ACTION

The Board of Supervisors will not receive updates on the Summer Camp program.

STEPS FOLLOWING APPROVAL

The Clerk of the Board will notify Jorge Montes from the SSA upon approval of this report.

Meeting History

Feb 11, 2020 9:30 AM Video Board of Supervisors Regular Meeting

Held to February 25, 2020 at the request of President Chavez.

At the request of President Chavez, the Board directed Administration to report to the Board on February 25, 2020 relating to budget allocations for the program.

RESULT:HELD [UNANIMOUS]Next: 2/25/2020 9:30 AM
MOVER:Cindy Chavez, President
SECONDER:Dave Cortese, Supervisor
AYES:Mike Wasserman, Cindy Chavez, Dave Cortese, Susan Ellenberg, S. Joseph Simitian

Transcript

Feb 11, 2020 9:30 AMVideo (Windows Media) MP4 VideoBoard of SupervisorsRegular Meeting

 
4:16 PMAgenda report relating to thefeasibility providing child careservices at major countycampuses. I'm finding that information inconnection with a referral I didback in mid-april or May of2018. Who we're asking for somethingthat's been in the hopper formore than two plus years. It's time to move from thinking out loud to delivering someresults.

4:17 PMI'm waiting on a few otherfolks. Thank you. We're going to move to custody health service study, this isitem 27. This was a referral that I madeand I want to appreciate that staff has stayed a long time tobe here for this. Thank you for that. Renee you want to make a couple of comments?
Good afternoon madam chairand board members.i'm director for the hospital system and oversee care system. The report indicates theoriginal intent of the referralwould not have gotten the information we requested by may,which is the budget review.

4:18 PMInformation as you requested.
Thank you, I think that's areally good solution.thanks for that. I don't have any cards on thisitem. Are my colleagues, anybody wantsto weigh in? Here's what i'm going to do. I want to say that when we didthe original study, Dr. Smith,i'm raising this just because of other issues we're addressingnow. When I brought this to the boardin December '17, one of the things that I was hoping to dowas look at the staffing studyin total so we'd be looking atthe medical services along with the other positions in the jail.







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